Electronic Drives and Controls Named First U.S. Siemens Solution Partner Certified for Drives & Motion

Parsippany, NJ – February 28, 2018 – Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc. (EDC), a leading control system integrator and field service company for industrial automation and drive technology, today announced it is the first U.S. Siemens Solution Partner to be certified for Drives & Motion. A Siemens Solution Partner since 2014, the company is also certified in Advanced Factory Automation.

With this new certification, EDC has established itself as a strategic solution partner and leading system integrator focused on helping manufacturers with obsolete drive and control technology to automate manual processes and upgrade aging equipment.

“Our congratulations go to Electronic Drives and Controls. This certification means their clients can always trust that EDC will professionally deliver the most advanced solutions based on the powerful combination of SINAMICS integrated drives and SIMATIC totally integrated automation,” said Peter Treible, National Industrial Partner Manager, Siemens.

“We are proud to have Electronic Drives and Controls as a Siemens Solution Partner! EDC has consistently proven that we can always count on them to deliver quality engineering and implementation services, the first time, every time, for our clients. This investment in certification is one of many reasons Siemens views EDC as a leader in their market.”

EDC has 50 years of experience integrating new control systems and repairing or retrofitting older equipment for a variety of manufacturing industries local to New Jersey, New York and Connecticut. With exceptional domain expertise, the company has also established itself nationwide as the go-to resource for manufacturers in the wire and cable, coating, laminating, and converting industries.

Electronic Drives and Controls Siemens
EDC Case Study - Siemens

“For the typical manufacturers we work with, older drives such as Siemens MasterDrives 6SE70 series have been great workhorses for years. We know because we have installed hundreds of them over the years,” said Chuck Dillard, vice president of EDC. “The problem is, as these older industrial drives and controls reach obsolescence, downtime for manufacturers becomes a costly problem with no OEM support and difficulty sourcing replacement parts. We help manufacturers retrofit existing equipment gaining the advantages of new automation technology at a fraction of the cost of purchasing new equipment.”

When upgrading older equipment, automating manual processes allows manufacturers to gain a competitive edge with greater throughput and efficiency. It also sets the stage for leveraging the industrial internet of things (IIoT) and digitalization of the shop floor.

In addition to EDC’s work with the manufacturing sector, the company has a field service business unit. Highly trained technicians perform repairs, large-scale retrofits, and preventative maintenance for customers in the pharmaceuticals, real estate management and HVAC industries.

About Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc.
Founded in 1968, Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc. (EDC) is a CSIA Certified control system integrator with a large field service team specializing in AC and DC drives, PLCs and factory automation. Family owned and operated for 50 years, EDC’s team of engineers and technicians has great depth of experience integrating new control systems and breathing life into older equipment. EDC has the engineering capability to design, build, start-up and service projects from the sophisticated to the simple and the service support team on call 24/7/365 to keep it all running at peak efficiency from day 1 and for years to come. In addition to the company’s certification as a Siemens Solution Partner and a Rockwell Automation Recognized System Integrator, EDC is a factory authorized/factory trained service center for over 40 drive brands.

Electronic Drives and Controls to Share Building HVAC Automation Expertise in May 8 Presentation at BuildingsNY 2018 Conference

Engineering Consultant Bob Pusateri of Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc. will share best practices for installation and maintenance of energy-efficient variable frequency drives (VFD) to maximize building owners’ utility cost savings over the life of HVAC systems.

Parsippany, NJ –May 6, 2018 – Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc. (EDC), a leading control system integrator and field service company for industrial automation and drive technology, today announced the company will present at the BuildingsNY 2018 Conference on May 8, 2018 at the Javits Center in NYC at 10:45am. The presentation, entitled “Ensuring VFDs Continue to Save You Money,” will be given by EDC’s Engineering Consultant, Bob Pusateri.

In his presentation, Bob Pusateri will share what building managers can expect from VFDs’ energy cost savings and how to maintain those savings. Bob graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with a degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1987. Since then, Bob has gained over 25 years’ experience in industrial controls, specifically with variable frequency drives and motion control. Before joining EDC as an engineering consultant in 2004, Bob held various relevant positions in manufacturing, sales, project management and development. Bob’s experience has given him exposure to thousands of applications in dozens of automation brands.

When asked what he is looking forward to most about the presentation, Bob says, “It has been known for decades that VFDs can significantly reduce a facility’s energy consumption, thus helping owners and managers contain costs while pleasing Mother Earth. We show you in simple terms how VFDs do it and how to keep them running around the clock.”

The BuildingsNY 2018 Conference brings together building owners and managers, facility and maintenance managers, superintendents, architects, contractors, developers and engineers with an opportunity to discover new ways to reduce overhead, manage risk and identify cost savings.

Pre-register for BuildingsNY ’18 and Bob Putaseri’s presentation here: http://www.buildingsny.com/en/Contributors/5571084/Pusateri-Bob

About Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc.  
Founded in 1968, Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc. (EDC) is a CSIA Certified control system integrator with a large field service team specializing in AC and DC drives, PLCs and factory automation. Family owned and operated for 50 years, EDC’s team of engineers and technicians has great depth of experience integrating new control systems and breathing life into older equipment. EDC has the engineering capability to design, build, start up and service projects from the sophisticated to the simple and the service support team on call 24/7/365 to keep it all running at peak efficiency from day 1 and for years to come. In addition to the company’s certifications as a Siemens Solution Partner and a Rockwell Automation Recognized System Integrator, EDC is a factory authorized/factory trained service center for over 40 drive brands.

Bob Pusateri of Electronic Drives and Controls Headshot

PLC Upgrade Using the Existing IO Rack

Are you wondering how to tackle your PLC retrofit project and avoid hours of rewiring?  Here’s a strategy you can use when upgrading from a legacy PLC to the same manufacturer’s latest and greatest CPU.

In the video above, we show you how to save substantial time and cost in a PLC upgrade.  Can’t listen?  Follow along with the text below.

Below we have a representation of a legacy-model PLC with an older, slower CPU and rack-mounted I/O modules.

Each module can contain as many as 32 inputs or outputs, potentially adding up to hundreds of wires to relocate. If we want to change out the CPU to take advantage of faster processing speeds and/or state-of-the-art communication protocols, a traditional rip-and-replace procedure is not only time consuming but could introduce new wiring issues that would need to be sorted out.

Instead, add to your panel a new, superfast CPU from the same PLC manufacturer, and as shown, a multi-port Ethernet switch.

Keep your PLC rack, I/O modules, and wiring intact and replace the CPU with a communications module such as Rockwell Automation’s Ethernet IP, Siemens Profinet, Beckhoff’s Ethercat, or one of the many others available in the automation marketplace.  Next, connect the remote I/O rack and then the new CPU to the Ethernet switch.

Move the PLC program from the old CPU to the new one.  Of course, this is easier said than done, but you will need to do this, regardless.  Now the new CPU can communicate with the remote I/O rack and “see” the status of the I/O, read analog values, or encoder inputs.

If for example, input #7 is pulled high on one of the modules of the rack, it will show up as such in the new PLC program without ever having to move a single wire.  Remember, the new CPU doesn’t even need to be in the same enclosure or mounted on the same panel.  It could be hundreds of feet away, connected to the remote rack’s Ethernet switch by a Cat 5 or Cat 6 cable.

Need help with your PLC retrofit project? Give Electronic Drives and Controls, the nationwide PLC and drives integration specialists, a call or click.

EDC Achieves Control System Integrator Association’s Certification, Meeting Highest Industry Standards

Electronic Drives and Controls achieves CSIA’s benchmark certification, meeting the highest level of technical and business performance standards in providing innovative control system integration solutions and field service work for industrial automation and drive technology.EDC CSIA certification

Parsippany, NJ – January 6, 2020 – Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc. (EDC), a leading control system integrator and field service company for industrial automation and drive technology, today announced the company has achieved certification by the Control System Integrator Association (CSIA), meeting the highest industry standard for successful management of a control system integration business.

“Congratulations to Electronic Drives and Controls on their successful CSIA re-certification. This is a testament to their serious commitment to continuous improvement,” said Jose M. Rivera, CSIA CEO.  “We commend the entire team for this important accomplishment. By supporting the CSIA Certification program Electronic Drives and Controls is not only advancing their company, they are also elevating the playing field for the entire control systems integration community.”

CSIA is a global trade association that seeks to advance the industry of control system integration.  To achieve CSIA certification, a company must demonstrate a commitment to delivering the highest level of quality, performance and reliability by meeting or exceeding the CSIA Best Practices and Benchmarks guidelines in ten key areas, encompassing both technical and business aspects of operation.

To achieve CSIA certification, a third-party auditor conducts an intensive review to confirm that the comprehensive CSIA Best Practices and Benchmarks have been implemented in ten key areas such as general management, human resources management, business development and sales management, financial management, project management, system development lifecycle, quality management, technical management, and other supporting activities.

“As a longtime CSIA member, we have deeply integrated the CSIA Best Practices and Benchmarks into our culture,” said Bud Dillard, president of Electronic Drives and Controls. “Having successfully achieved the rigorous CSIA certification allows us to demonstrate to our customers that our sound business practices and strong technical proficiency substantially reduce their project risk.”

About Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc.  
Founded in 1968, Electronic Drives and Controls, Inc. (EDC) is a CSIA Certified control system integrator with a large field service team specializing in AC and DC drives, PLCs and factory automation headquartered in Parsippany, NJ. Family owned and operated for 50 years, EDC’s team of engineers and technicians has great depth of experience integrating new control systems and breathing life into older equipment. EDC has the engineering capability to design, build, start-up and service projects from the sophisticated to the simple and the service support team on call 24/7/365 to keep it all running at peak efficiency from day 1 and for years to come. In addition to the company’s certification as a Siemens Solution Partner and a Rockwell Automation Recognized System Integrator, EDC is a factory authorized/factory trained service center for over 40 drive brands.  For more information, visit the company’s website, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

5 Controls-Based Causes of Scrap

Often, when people think about causes of scrap, they think about something like a damaged fixture, or worn-out tooling.

Those examples are both mechanical issues, and can contribute to a large amount of scrap being generated in a system. Now the real question is, are there any other areas that can contribute to scrap?

The answer is yes, and one of those main areas is on the controls side of the system. While frequently overlooked, controls related scrap can start as soon as a system is installed.  Below are 5 sources of scrap and how they can be solved with controls solutions.

Analog

Certain devices, like many analog sensors, can be very sensitive to changes in temperature, humidity and other weather conditions. Not using a sensor in its correct environment can lead to inconsistencies in the feedback generated by the device.

Having the right type of device for the job is important, but making sure that the device is able to work accurately in your environment is crucial.

Electrical Noise

Electrical noise occurs when there are unwanted disturbances in an electrical signal. This can become a major issue, especially with analog signals and cause a system to react in un-intended ways.

Using the correct type of cable and shielding can help to reduce the electrical noise created in the system. It is important to not only look at the signal cables, but the communication and power cables as well.

Outdated Programming

Over the years, and sometimes even months, the conditions can change in a system. Maybe product was sourced from a new supplier, or a whole new product type was added to the line. It may seem more appropriate to make a series of quick patches to get the system back up and running, but you need to also look at the long-term implications.

Properly updating software for new changes and added complexity can help reduce the amount of time spent on adjusting just to make things work. When qualifying the added expense of the software updates, make sure to include the reduction of scrap in the ROI.

Inconsistent Hardware Controls

A lot of hardware in a system can have some degree of variability such as the speed of a motor, the pressure for a pneumatic line, or the amount of product dispensed per cycle. Improperly monitoring or controlling vital pieces of hardware can greatly increase scrap, especially between multiple shifts and newly trained operators.

Recipes are a great way to collect setpoints that can be used to drive the automation. With the added ability to save changes and load different recipes, you can reduce the amount of scrap between product changes.

Tension Control

Variations in the tension of your product can lead to rips, wrinkles, and/or printing issues. Not only can this lead to an increase in scrap, but also downtime to get the line back up and running.

Consider adding in one or more tension zones including a load cell or a dancer to gain greater control of your product and reduce the amount of scrap created. Making any adjustments to a tension process can be a trying process and, in most cases, it is beneficial to seek expert opinions on the subject.

 

EDC can help you diagnose your causes of scrap and create a solution to provide you with a more efficient process. For more information, contact us.